Creating a Confederate Kentucky
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Creating a Confederate Kentucky the lost cause and Civil War memory in a border state by Anne E. Marshall

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Published by University of North Carolina Press in Chapel Hill .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementAnne E. Marshall
SeriesCivil War America
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE509 .M37 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24553020M
ISBN 109780807834367
LC Control Number2010020419
OCLC/WorldCa607975622

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In Creating a Confederate Kentucky, Anne E. Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between and , belying the fact that Kentucky never left the the Civil War, the people of Kentucky appeared to forget their Union loyalties and embraced the Democratic politics, racial violence, and Jim Crow laws associated with former . Dr. Ann Marshall's CREATING A CONFEDERATE KENTUCKY is a well written and well researched book. It points out the deception used by President Lincoln in order to keep the border states from seceeding. Lincoln's famous quote that to lose Kentucky would be to lose it all reveals the importance he gave to the state of his birth/5(9). In Anne Marshall's book, Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State, "image is everything" aptly describes Kentucky's ties to the Confederacy in the post-war years. Marshall shows how Kentucky's identity as a "Confederate" state blossomed, starting soon after the end of the Civil War (being planted during the war .   Creating a Confederate Kentucky is an excellent book: tightly argued, richly detailed, and elegantly written. It is a model of what a state study can do, showing the importance of not just race, but also place, to the story of the Lost Cause.

Creating a Confederate Kentucky: the lost cause and Civil War memory in a border state / Anne E. Marshall.—1st ed. — (Civil War America) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN (cloth: alk. paper) ky—History—Civil War, –—Social aspects. tive memory—Kentucky.   Tagged as: anne e. marshall, Civil War Memory, creating a confederate kentucky, the university of north carolina press Check out the Siege of Petersburg Online for daily posts on battle accounts in newspaper articles, diary entries, letters and more! What are your Top 10 Gettysburg Books?See what a panel of bloggers said recently.   As I argue at length in my book, “Creating a Confederate Kentucky,” whites erected Confederate monuments not only to remember the past, but to control the present. Local news has never been. Rather than focusing exclusively on postwar political and economic factors, ###Creating a Confederate Kentucky# looks over the longer term at Kentuckians' activities--public memorial ceremonies, dedications of monuments, and veterans organizations' events--by which they commemorated the Civil War and fixed the state's remembrance of it for sixty years following .

|In Creating a Confederate Kentucky, Anne E. Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between and , belying the fact that Kentucky never left the Union. After the Civil War, the people of Kentucky appeared to forget their Union loyalties and embraced the Democratic politics, racial violence, and Jim Crow.   Creating a Confederate Kentucky by Anne E. Marshall, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(32).   A valuable and serious history of the development of Confederate memory in Kentucky and in America An excellent book for any student of Reconstruction, the process of reconciliation or the years after the Civil War.—TOCWOC: A Civil War Blog Marshall's book is beautifully written and truly a pleasure to read.—Journal of Southern HistoryBrand: The University of North Carolina Press. Book Description: Historian E. Merton Coulter famously said that Kentucky "waited until after the war was over to secede from the Union." In this fresh study, Anne E. Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between and that belied the fact that Kentucky never left the Union and that more Kentuckians fought for the North than for the .